February/March 2010

The Master

The Master

The Master

In New York and Dublin in the 1960s, Tony MacMahon lived with, played with and learned from uilleann piper Séamus Ennis.

Published on 1 February 2010

Tony MacMahon is a traditional musician and former television producer in RTÉ, where he produced The Pure Drop, The Green Linnet, Aisling Gheal, The Long Note, The Blackbird and the Bell and many other series. He has made two solo recordings, Tony MacMahon (1972) and MacMahon from Clare (2000), and recorded I gCnoc na Graí (1985) with Noel Hill and Aislingí Ceoil (1994) with Noel Hill and Iarla Ó Lionáird.

After Franco

After Franco

After Franco

From the 1950s until the 1980s, Franco Luambo Makiadi and his TPOK Jazz orchestra profoundly shaped the sound of African music across the continent, and subsequently the popular music of the world through artists such as Paul Simon and Talk

Published on 1 February 2010

Kasongo Musanga is a Congolese scholar and musician living in London.

The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson

The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson

The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson

Where did it all go right – and wrong – for Michael Jackson, asks Peter Rosser.

Published on 1 February 2010

Peter Rosser (1970–2014) was a composer, writer and music lecturer.

He was born in London and moved to Belfast in 1990, where he studied composition at the University of Ulster and was awarded a DPhil in 1997. His music has been performed at the Spitalfields Festival in London, the Belfast Festival at Queen’s and by the Crash Ensemble in Dublin.

In 2011 the Arts Council acknowledged his contribution to the arts in Northern Ireland through a Major Individual Artist Award. He used this award to write his Second String Quartet, which was premiered in 2012 by the JACK Quartet at the opening concert at Belfast's new Metropolitan Arts Centre (The MAC).

Peter Rosser also wrote extensively on a wide range of music genres, with essays published in The Wire, Perspectives of New Music and the Crescent Journal. 

He died following an illness on 24 November 2014, aged 44.

A Whole New Thing

A Whole New Thing

A Whole New Thing

Alice Echols tells a forgotten story of daring, cross-racial experimentation across rock, funk and disco.

Published on 1 February 2010

Alice Echols is a cultural critic and historian. Her latest book is Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture (W.W Norton).

New Books

New Books

Richard Wagner: Self-Promotion and the Making of a Brand byNicholas Vazsonyi (Cambridge University Press) examines the innovativeways in which Wagner made himself a celebrity, promoting himself usingevery means available: autobiography, jou

Published on 1 February 2010

Ictus

Ictus

ictus, Flagey, Brussels, 3 December 2009

Published on 1 February 2010

Stephen Graham is a lecturer in music at Goldsmiths, University of London. He blogs at www.robotsdancingalone.wordpress.com.

Snakes and Ladders

Snakes and Ladders

Snakes and Ladders; Daniel Figgis (drums), Cormac Figgis (bass), Roger Doyle (piano), Mark Scully (drums), Colum Jordan (bass), Brian Ó hUiginn (uilleann pipes), Conor Brady (guitar), Symphony Space, New York City, 8 January 2010

Published on 1 February 2010

Andrew Christopher Smith is a composer and pianist living in Brooklyn, New York.

Ghost Story

Ghost Story

Ghost Story

Arthur Russell, cellist and composer, was born in 1951. In 1973, he moved to New York City and lived in the same East Village apartment for almost twenty years.

Published on 1 February 2010

Tim Lawrence is the author of Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973–92 and Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970–79.

Heather O'Donnell/Responses to Ives

Heather O'Donnell/Responses to Ives

Heather O’Donnell, Responses to Ives, Mode Records (Mode 211)

Published on 1 February 2010

Bob Gilmore (1961–2015) was a musicologist, educator and keyboard player. Born in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland, he studied at York University, Queen's University Belfast, and at the University of California.

Between 2005 and 2012, Bob Gilmore published several articles in The Journal of Music, including seven significant profiles of Irish composers.

His books include Harry Partch: a biography (Yale University Press, 1998) and Ben Johnston: Maximum Clarity and other writings on music (University of Illinois Press, 2006), both of which were recipients of the Deems Taylor Award from ASCAP. He wrote extensively on the American experimental tradition, microtonal music and spectral music, including the work of such figures as James Tenney, Horațiu Rădulescu, Claude Vivier, and Frank Denyer. 

Bob Gilmore taught at Queens University, Belfast, Dartington College of Arts, Brunel University in London, and was a Research Fellow at the Orpheus Institute in Ghent. He was the founder, director and keyboard player of Trio Scordatura, an Amsterdam-based ensemble dedicated to the performance of microtonal music, and for the year 2014 was the Editor of Tempo, a quarterly journal of new music. His biography of French-Canadian composer Claude Vivier was published by University of Rochester Press in June 2014.

Radar: Midem 2010

Radar: Midem 2010

Radar: Midem 2010

Cannes – The teenagers employed to demonstrate the joys of Rockband – complete with full stage, bass and lead guitars, mics and kit – must have been wondering why the game was suddenly becoming such hard work. Situated by the café...

Published on 1 February 2010

The Musical Priest

The Musical Priest

The Musical Priest

He was a cantankerous eccentric who stressed that the Irish language and music were inseparable. Richard Henebry should not be forgotten, writes Ciaran Carson

Published on 1 February 2010

Ciaran Carson is a poet, prose writer, translator and flute-player, and the author of Last Night’s Fun, a book about Irish traditional music. He is is Professor of Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast.

Have a Little Faith

Have a Little Faith

Have a Little Faith

Promoters of art mislead audiences by suggesting that there is meaning where there is none. Sometimes you just have to trust the artist, writes John McLachlan

Published on 1 February 2010

John McLachlan is a composer and member of Aosdána. www.johnmclachlan.info