January/February 2001

After the Fianna: Reality and Perceptions of Traditional Singing in Ireland

After the Fianna: Reality and Perceptions of Traditional Singing in Ireland

Collector Tom Munnelly assesses the state of Irish traditional singing today.

Published on 1 January 2001

Tom Munnelly (1944-2007), born in Dublin but resident in Miltown Malbay, Co Clare, since 1978, made the largest field-collection of Irish traditional song ever compiled by any individual. After recording privately in the 1960s, and collecting especially from Traveller singers, he became a professional folklore collector and archivist with the Department of Irish Folklore, University College Dublin (now the UCD Delargy Centre for Irish Folklore and the National Folklore Collection), from 1974 to date, with a concentration on English-language song. He lectured and taught widely, was a leading activist in many folk music organisations and festivals, including the Folk Music Society of Ireland, the Willie Clancy Summer School and the Clare Festival of Traditional Singing, and he served on national bodies such as the Arts Council. He was the founding Chairman of the Irish Traditional Music Archive from 1987 to 1993. Recently he was presented with the festschrift Dear Far-Voiced Veteran: Essays in Honour of Tom Munnelly, and was made an honorary Doctor of Literature by the National University of Ireland Galway.

Ó Riada is Dead – Long Live Ó Riada!

Ó Riada is Dead – Long Live Ó Riada!

Ó Riada is Dead – Long Live Ó Riada!

Composer Raymond Deane tackles the ongoing 'Ó Riada myth'.

Published on 1 January 2001

Raymond Deane is a composer, pianist, author and activist. Together with the violinist Nigel Kennedy, he is a cultural ambassador of Music Harvest, an organisation seeking to create 'a platform for cultural events and dialogue between internationals and Palestinians...'.