NPIF PhD Studentship in Music: AI-assisted compositions

NPIF PhD Studentship in Music: AI-assisted compositions

Monday, 2 July 2018, 11.55pm

The Royal Northern College of Music invites high-quality applications for a three-year PhD studentship, fully funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). RNCM is one of the seven members of the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership. These prestigious and highly competitive studentships cover the full cost of fees and an additional stipend for living costs (UK applicants only) at £14,777 per annum.

The NWCDTP, with funding from the National Productivity Investment Fund (NPIF), has made available an additional studentship to start in September 2018. The project addresses AI and the data revolution, by embedding and maximising the advantages of AI and data within musical composition. The successful candidate will be a skilled composer with a unique voice, a growing national/international reputation, and significant experience in writing for large acoustic ensembles (eg orchestra) with/without electronics. Computer programming skills are desirable although not essential.

This doctoral studentship will be associated with the RNCM and Industry partner the BBC Philharmonic, the BBC’s orchestra in the North of England, based in Salford. The successful candidate will become the first PhD candidate to be associated with the RNCM’s recently established centre for Practice & Research in Science & Music (PRiSM).

See further details at the link below. 

Website

Published on 13 June 2018

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