Reviews

Once Was Dust
Exploring scientific theory, natural phenomena and human behaviour, 'In Clouds' is a new collaborative performance directed by composer Peter Power. Commissioned by Cork Midsummer Festival and Triskel Arts Centre to mark 40 years of the venue, the work was performed on 15 June. Don O'Mahony reviews.
Honesty and Vulnerability
Chamber Choir Ireland, conducted by Nicolas Fink, created a programme of sacred but intensely personal music with Between Us. Anna Murray reviews their performance at Hugh Lane Gallery.
Irish Stew
As he tours, experimental vocalist Damo Suzuki creates ad hoc bands, formed only for each performance. In Dublin and Cork, he gathered a rare mix of artists from the Irish indie and improvisation scenes – Anna Murray reviews.
A High-Wire Act
The debut album from The High Seas trio contains feverish music and some classic moments, writes Toner Quinn.
Emanating Sparks
At this year's Drogheda Arts Festival, Louth Contemporary Music Society presented a spectralist work from the 1970s alongside a postminimalist one from the last decade and a series of techno-inspired shorts. Brendan Finan finds the connections.
Glorious Shambles
Gerald Barry's inspirations come from many sources – his new Organ Concerto, performed in Dublin last week, was partly inspired by a cat mourning the loss of atonality – or was it? Adrian Smith reviews.
An Otherworldly Destination
Composer Judith Ring's first body of work featuring her own singing is both gentle and complex writes Shannon McNamee in her second Journal of Music/Galway City Council Music Writer Mentoring Scheme review.
Hamilton's Relentless Pursuit
Andrew Hamilton's 'music for people who like art' was the nearest thing to a smash hit in contemporary music, writes Adrian Smith. A new recording on the NMC label includes works composed either side of it too.
Reimagining Belfast
Fiddle-player Conor Caldwell's diverse new album is inspired by both the historic work of collector Edward Bunting and the sounds of contemporary Belfast, writes Toner Quinn.
Misunderstandings, Trickery and Guile
Irish National Opera's production of The Marriage of Figaro was fresh, visually arresting and cartoonish, writes Brendan Finan. But why does opera still rely on women's stories as told by men?