Yukine Kuroki Wins Dublin International Piano Competition 2022

Yukine Kuroki following her win at the NCH, with President Michael D. Higgins, John O'Conor and members of the jury. (Photo: Erica Coburn)

Yukine Kuroki Wins Dublin International Piano Competition 2022

Final took place at the National Concert Hall on 24 May.
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Japanese pianist Yukine Kuroki has won the 12th Dublin International Piano Competition, which took place this week from 17 to 24 May.

Kuroki, born in 1999, is currently studying at the Showa University of Music in Japan with Fumiko Eguchi. She was previously a prize winner of competitions in Lithuania, South Korea, Japan, China, Kazakhstan, Italy and the United States, and has performed with the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, Kanagawa Philharmonic Orchestra, Astana Symphony Orchestra, State Symphony Orchestra of Tatarstan, Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra, Polish Silesian Philharmonic Orchestra and Shenzhen Symphony Orchestra. She is also a finalist in this year’s International Franz Liszt Piano Competition in Utrecht, which takes place in September

The DIPC final took place at the National Concert Hall on 24 May. Four finalists each performed a concerto with the National Symphony Orchestra under Gerhard Markson. Kuroki performed Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1.

Second prize went to Yasuko Furumi (Japan), third prize went to Roman Kosyakov (Russia) and fourth prize went to Robert Bily (Czechia).

The Charles J. Brennan Prize and McCullough Bursary for the highest placed Irish performer went to Rowel Friers. The winner of the Ita Stephens Prize for the best performance of a piece by Beethoven played in any round of the competition was Arisa Onoda (Japan). The Bridget Doolan Prize for the best performance of a piece by Mozart played in any round of the competition went to Roman Kosyakov.

Performers select their own programme. In the semi-final, they perform one of three pieces commissioned by RTÉ lyric FM from Irish composers Amanda Feery, David Fennessy, Deirdre McKay and Ryan Molloy. In the final, they select a concerto from a list of works from the 18th to 20th centuries.

The Dublin International Piano Competition caused controversy in March when it banned Russian pianists from entering the competition following the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The decision was subsequently reversed after public criticism.

The judging panel of 12 included John O’Conor (chair), Anne-Marie McDermott, Finghin Collins and Susan Starr.

For further information on the competition, visit www.dipc.ie.

Published on 25 May 2022

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