Baroque

Is Great Music Always Subversive?

Is Great Music Always Subversive?

Is Great Music Always Subversive?

A major book by American writer Ted Gioia, published last autumn, explores the history of music and many overlooked traditions, and argues that the best music has almost always been subversive. James Camien McGuiggan reviews.

Published on 5 August 2020

James Camien McGuiggan holds a PhD in the philosophy of art from the University of Southampton. Prior to this, he studied music in Maynooth University. He is currently an independent scholar, with interests in the philosophy of music and R. G. Collingwood.

Interweaving Lines

Interweaving Lines

Interweaving Lines

What is the common heritage between traditional Irish tunes and Baroque dances? Adrian Scahill reviews a new recording on the RTÉ Lyric FM label.

Published on 28 June 2018

Adrian Scahill is a lecturer in traditional music at Maynooth University.

The Crack Goes On

The Crack Goes On

The Crack Goes On

Writer, poet and flute-player Ciaran Carson remembers the traditional music group Planxty and reviews a recent book on the pioneering band.

Published on 1 January 2007

Ciaran Carson (1948–2019) was a poet, prose writer, translator and flute-player. He was the author of Last Night’s Fun – A Book about Irish Traditional Music, The Pocket Guide to Traditional Irish Music, The Star Factory, and the poetry collections The Irish for No, Belfast Confetti and First Language: Poems. He was Professor of Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast. Between 2008 and 2010 Ciaran wrote a series of linked columns for the Journal of Music, beginning with 'The Bag of Spuds' and ending with 'The Raw Bar'.