Adrian Smith

Adrian Smith is Lecturer in Musicology at DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama.

How Not to Market Classical Music
The marketing of orchestral concerts is becoming increasingly whimsical and condescending in an attempt to make classical music more accessible, but audiences deserve more respect, argues Adrian Smith.
Not Your Ordinary Megalomaniacal Psycho
Irish National Opera presented the Irish staged premiere of Bartók's 'Bluebeard’s Castle' on 12–14 October, with its luminous music and dark folk-tale of castle doors revealing the inner world of the protagonist. The production came with a twist, however, writes Adrian Smith.
New Music on the Margins
The 'Music of Our Time' concerts struggle to find an audience on mid-week afternoons. Adrian Smith examines how a lack of regard for new music and a lack of vision impact the series.
Against Resignation: An Interview with Raymond Deane
Is there a lack of solidarity among composers? Will classical music ever become a part of Ireland's national consciousness? And have young Irish composers unwittingly subscribed to a code of musical prohibitions influenced by the US? In a wide-ranging interview, Raymond Deane, whose new opera 'Vagabones' will be premiered in 2019, discusses aesthetics, politics and occasional strokes of good luck with Adrian Smith.
On Risk and Restraint
Adrian Smith reviews the opening concert of the Irish Chamber Orchestra's 2018/19 season, conducted by French conductor Jean-Christophe Spinosi and featuring a new work by Sam Perkin.
The New Normal?
The RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra has just announced its 2018/19 season. Adrian Smith looks at the range of music on offer – from contemporary and classical to traditional – and considers some of the overall trends in programming.
Glorious Shambles
Gerald Barry's inspirations come from many sources – his new Organ Concerto, performed in Dublin in May, was partly inspired by a cat mourning the loss of atonality – or was it? Adrian Smith reviews.
Hamilton's Relentless Pursuit
Andrew Hamilton's 'music for people who like art' was the nearest thing to a smash hit in contemporary music, writes Adrian Smith. A new recording on the NMC label includes works composed either side of it too.
Opera for Our Time
Adrian Smith reads Adès’s 'Powder Her Face' as a story of female empowerment and upper-class complacency in the very promising first production from Irish National Opera.
Love and Conflict at the NCH
It is a critical time for the RTÉ NSO, but it celebrated its 70th year with a diverse programme and impassioned performances, writes Adrian Smith.
Crash Hit the Twenties Running
Crash Ensemble celebrated 20 years with two nights at the National Concert Hall in November. Adrian Smith reviews all twenty newly commissioned works, from composers Andrew Hamilton, Ann Cleare, Jennifer Walshe, Sean Clancy and many more.
An Orchestra Out of Step?
An orchestra playing less new music, writes Adrian Smith, is out of step with contemporary culture. Has the amount of contemporary music being played by the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra been in decline in recent years? Smith undertook an analysis of recent programming.
Informal Art
Gábor Tákacs-Nagy's rapport with orchestra and audience is refreshing, writes Adrian Smith, in a review of the Irish Chamber Orchestra (27 September) performing Elgar, Brahms and the world premiere of Sam Perkin's '365 Variations on a Gesture'.
Gwendolyn Masin, Origin – Exploring Roots and Identity
Born in Amsterdam, raised in Ireland, and descended from a long line of musicians from Central and Eastern Europe, Gwendolyn Masin explores her rich roots in 'Origin', writes Adrian Smith.
What is Really Happening at the National Concert Hall?
Is the NCH embarking on a ground-breaking curatorial experiment by embracing non-classical genres? Nothing could be further from the truth, writes Adrian Smith.
Wide World of Petcu
The eclecticism on percussionist Alex Petcu's debut recording works very much in its favour, writes Adrian Smith.
McHale's Skilful Shaping
In his new recordings of Field and Hammond, Michael McHale always has the larger structural goals in view, writes Adrian Smith.